Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House

Why You Should Eat More Potatoes

Find out more about Why You Should Eat More Potatoes

Leading the movement against potato-hate crimes – why you should eat them! Evie Whitehead, a nutritionist and gut health specialist explains.

Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House
Love Potatoes | Best Potato Recipes | Potato House

I am fronting the movement against “potato-hate crimes” due to their recent bad press. These starchy tubers have been disregarded in more recent years, shoved to the bottom of the keto vegetable pile and labelled as food that makes us pack on the pounds! But I am here to shine a more virtuous light on the humble potato and share a few nutrition facts to make you treasure these little starch-bombs once again.

Satiety – they keep you full for longer

Did you know that new potatoes came out as clear winners in the scale of satiety? There is an actual satiety index comparing how satisfying certain foods are. New potatoes were at least two thirds more satisfying than other food items, keeping you full for longer which means reaching for less snacks between meals! This is great news for you if you know you are a ‘grazer’ or ‘serial-snacker’! If this is you, including 3-4 new potatoes in your lunch could result in eating less calories ultimately especially if that afternoon 3-4pm blood sugar crash normally has you reaching for coffee and chocolate/cake?! Sound familiar? If you know that sugar cravings get the better of you, read my latest blog.

Resistant starch

Did you also know that potatoes are a brilliant source of something called resistant starch? Resistant starch is exactly what it says! It is resistant to our digestive enzymes resulting in it reaching our large intestine largely intact as we are unable to break the starches down and digest them. This is good on two counts; firstly because it is resistant, it doesn’t raise blood glucose levels as it can’t be digested in the small intestine. Secondly, as it reaches the large intestine it provides a source of food for your gut bacteria which we know is important to look after; my article explains more about gut and something called “leaky gut” 

There are other foods that contain resistant starch such as bananas (slightly on the green side), beans, peas, lentils, oats, barley and cooked/cooled pasta and rice. These are rich sources of fibre which helps to feed the gut bacteria whilst providing high levels of satiety for us. As they are high in fibre that can’t ever be digested they are brilliant roughage for the large bowel and help to reduce constipation and keep things “moving”. If you suffer with chronic constipation you may benefit from booking a free discovery call with me so I can find out a little more and tell you how I can help you and you can see how I have helped my clients with similar symptoms by watching the video testimonials *visit Testimonial page

Eat better feel better

Have I changed your mind about potatoes? Obviously I am not suggesting you pile your plate high with them but adding a serving (a clenched fist sized serving) can help you feel satisfied and do wonders for your gut health at the same time.

To find out more about ways to “eat better and feel better” in a realistic and achievable way for life contact Evie Whitehead, nutritionist and gut health specialist based in Bourne End, Buckinghamshire. Helping clients reach their health potential through the power of food and natural solutions.

This article first appeared in and is (c) Evie Nutrition.  This is used on Love Potatoes with kind permission.

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